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21

With Gimp comes a plugin Resynthesize together with a Python script Heal Selection. On Linux the plugin is contained in the package gimp-plugin-registry. After selecting an area with the select tool: We can "heal" this selection from "Filters > Enhance > Heal selection...". Here I made a random healing with 10 pixels from the ...


15

I would approach this in a similar way to horatio, but I would probably keep the original image in tact as much as possible (assuming you want to preserve it). I'd create a similar texture to the paper like so: It's just a noise texture against a subtle gradient with some distortions via a horizontal and vertical scale. You'll notice some color variations ...


6

I would like to create a comic strip, or, rather, a set of comic strips, for posting on social networks such as Facebook or Pinterest. Your intention sounds good. How can I start with the following strips and just modify the clouds where they talk? You cannot start with those strips you quoted, because those are under copyright. You copied even the ...


5

Because you are editing out text (e.g. radically altering the original), one way to do this is to cheat: Edit the image so that the yellowed paper is no longer yellowed. Blank out to your heart's content, then overlay a new all-over fake yellowing paper effect. This will be uniform.


4

I believe the answer to this question is based in opinion, that being said, here's my own: Tools: Wacom Tablet Reasoning: In order to properly ink your drawings, you need to have the same movement and feel as your hand. It seems your frustration lay in the amount of time to execute the curves you needed. A tablet greatly reduces the manual point-by-point ...


4

If you are feeling adventurous you can implement the Texture-Synthesis algorithm described here it fills pixels with those which have a similar neighborhood creating an almost seamless extension of a texture or filling in holes, here are some examples Gimp supports scripting, so you could write a plugin for this (I planned to do it myself a while ago but ...


4

The copy and paste will give best results without ruining the texture and color of that particular balloon. What I generally do is start fairly small copy paste a few times, then merge the layers together (does Seashore have layers?) but stop just before the original. Then you have a larger sample to continue working with. Before you continue copying and ...


3

You'll probably lose some color contrast once you convert from RGB to CYMK. Some colors shift slightly depending on the rendering intent & the cmyk color profile you pick. That's why pre-press production (from RGB to CMYK) is a good skill to have. Someone like Cartier-Bresson was an excellent photographer but he had nothing to do with the final quality ...


3

Choosing a typeface is about pairing the elements in your design together. Designing an invite for a high-fashion event? Consider a Didone. Working on a menu for a BBQ Joint? Consider some vernacular retro wood type. Working on a thesis? A sturdy serif text face is probably a safe bet. The key is that you're pairing the typeface with the design moreso than ...


3

Using black as the outer colour of the panels seems to work in my experience. Here's an example: http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/scottpilgrim4.jpg


2

Take a pencil. Take a notebook. Start sketching. Once you are comfortable with that, try telling a story through your images. Once you are comfortable with that, then google specific techniques for making comics. But the two basic, fundamental things you have to learn is how to express a situation and a story through images.


2

I was going to say something about posture, but when you get to my age, it hurts no matter how you sit. From a technical perspective, there is value in changing your distance in order to both get an overall sense of the work and a close-up view. You have close-in covered. One way to get back from the work (aside from getting out of the chair) is to use a "...


2

I think you can use a comic font, which is appropriate for a comic, but still improve the legibility by changing other aspects of your typography: Use a font that uses both upper and lowercase for the longer explanations (all caps might be fine for titles Give the texts more "breathing room", separate them more from the container edges Be careful with your ...


2

I would suggest one of the following: TikZ is a LaTeX package that enables you to draw diagrams directly from LaTeX source code. The main advantage is that the text is rendered by LaTeX and you can typset formulas as in LaTeX. Thus you do not have to hassle with other ways to render formulas and your text matches your main text in font and size. The main ...


2

From a technical standpoint the font looks like it does because back in the day comics' text balloons were "speedballed" with, you guessed it, Speedball pens, which were THE standard for quick, jobbing hand-lettering from about WW1 until the computer made jobbing work look outdated and cheap. From the Speedball site: In the early days of the twentieth ...


1

When you are doing artwork which must be fit for both print and web, there is no need to worry too much about the web version. Print files are normally larger than web files (unless it's a very tiny physical format) so if you have a print ready file, you can always downscale it in the end to make a version for web. Setting up a file for print As you ...


1

It depends on the exact comic, but according to this source, Hergé mostly drew his pages slightly larger than A3*. And that usually one page indeed was done on one sheet although that was not always the case, in some cases the originals were strips reorganized into albums. Image 1: Drawing boards of Hergé, showing them in original size. Image source, same ...


1

Here is a good graphic novel software: Manga Studio Clip Studio Paint I think Clip studio paint is the advertisement you saw


1

Something similar can be achieved entirely within Photoshop. Create a rounded rectangle and add a stroke effect, and choose a pattern fill. Although this will only work for small stroke sizes of around 2px. You could also use an outer glow effect, and apply some noise to get a thicker irregular line. You could even combine both stroke and outer glow ...


1

If you have acces to Illustrator you can cut and paste from there as well layer masks as the needed borders with customized strokes. The following screenshot shows a few preset artistic strokes. One can easily make an own stroke pattern as a straight line. Then it's available for arbitary curves. Even scanned real strokes can be used after tracing them to ...


1

The fonts size is... whatever looks good. Your real problem is creating images that are big enough to print correctly at 300PPI (or 400PPI as in your tutorial). If your comic print size is 8-inch across that means an image which is at least 2400pixels wide. Then if you use Gimp in dot-for-dot mode (View>Dot-for-dot), the image is displayed with your screen ...


1

The best inking methods that I've found so far are: In Photoshop, using a Wacom Tablet, an inking brush (try a google search for some good bruskes) and using the software Lazy Nezumi Pro, which helps with drawing smooth lines. It's paid software but I've found it really helps me with digital drawing In Illustrator with the pen tool but yes, it does take ...


1

I'm only making a brainstorm here: You can play with the style of the background perhaphs: Lot less detail In negative if it is black and white Diferent color schemes, the sky not blue for example All the flashbacks in a dawn, or with a dramathic ilumination in interiors. Blurry ones Curvier or straighter lines Start with a close up of the main character ...


1

That font definitely feels unprofessional to me. If you want to keep with the form and feeling but add readability & professionalism, I'd probably use a 'loud' font that looks good in all caps (or small caps, which may be a good solution here). Possible free fonts that I can think of that may work well for you: Bebas Neue Montserrat Gotham, ...


1

Does it matter? My entire thought about creation of art is "Whatever works for you." There are no rules or best practices directly related to creation. It's only in production where there are guidelines. Now, that being posted, you may find that you feel better and can draw longer if you just try and take care of your posture a bit more. :) I developed a ...


1

You can set your document space as RGB (so you have access to all the filters) but set the preview as CMYK (so you get an idea of how it will look once printed). To set the preview as CMYK, select "Menu->View->Proof Setup" and select "Working CMYK". This way, you would be drawing in the RGB space but you will be shown a soft (approximate) proof of how it ...


1

See also Glyphtracer: Glyphtracer takes an image of letters. It detects all letter forms and allows the user to tag them. They are then vectorised and passed on to Fontforge for fine tuning. https://launchpad.net/glyphtracer


1

There is also a free web based comic service called Toondoo. Haven't used it for a few years, but from memory you can upload your own images or use their prebuilt cartoon characters.


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