New answers tagged

1

If you don't have an appointment letter, tell them you don't have an appointment letter and explain why this is. Show them the Paypal balance sheets or whatever they're called. You don't want to start a new job with some made-up excuse. Also, working full-time for a single company is not actually freelance in many places, but more like remote employment. ...


0

Thank you all for your answers. I’m doing my best to try to get my name out there and get my business off the ground. It hasn’t been easy. Of course there’s bound to be mistakes but this isn’t one I can make twice. I appreciate all of you taking the time to add your input. ✌🏼


0

Nothing we can help you with. When no contract is involved and everything seems to be handled and agreed on verbally, then the terms are updated multiple times - again verbally - the so called 'client' is not actually a client, but just a person that sometimes pays for something with no legal obligation. Best thing you can bargain for is a discount.


4

There are a lot of good answers here. I would add a couple of other points for consideration that might be useful for future relationships (I've been a self-employed developer/designer for ~20 years). It's perfectly valid (I think), to call a print-shop and say "Hey, what stock did you print our cards on last time?". Asking you for things like that only ...


10

I'm the “get off my lawn” type. You get nothing by default and I carry pocket sand. Old design artifacts – in one batch, once, for free. By old, I mean shipped before. This is a professional courtesy and a test of your professional backup system – if it’s hard to produce these there is a structural defect in how you run your company, very much worth fixing....


22

I would let it go 100%. Answer all their questions and put a deadline date after which you are no longer taking requests. I will gladly help with this information, but you need to take over internally asap. They will figure things out sooner than you'd expect. I had a client like this. Similar story. Worked for about 8 years on pretty much everything ...


10

tl:dr; Don't hold back on information that is not specifically yours, but let them do the leg work since they're not your client anymore. If you want to be non-confrontational, I would definitely try to deflect as much as possible so that you don't seem like the bad guy. There are a couple of things here: Source files Other than branding material (...


4

Personal experience, take it as this, and sorry for the english. Once I had to testify in a process as a person indirectly involved. I worked as a freelance designer for an adviser's office with a small advertising agency. I had a direct relationship with the clients, excellent with all of them. My job was to design, provide and present designs directly to ...


16

I wouldn't give them or any client really anything if its one of your sources. "Thank you for your inquiry. My sources and vendors are part of the value I bring through my X years of experience. Just as you have your sources for Y and Z (whatever they do) and wouldn't want to be disclosing that. I cannot provide you with this information as it will cause ...


11

Since I like playing devil's advocate, I'll elaborate on situations where I think that kind of request would make sense. (spoiler: there aren't many) You have a client who has shown to be respectful of your work and time in the past, and the changes are content based, and there is a lot. Example from my experience: I had a client who is a pipe organ ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


7

This is a micromanager. This person is, as Billy Kerr notes, trying to stand over your shoulder and tell you exactly what to do. That is not a client you want to accommodate. Maybe this person doesn't trust you as a designer to execute his or her ideas, or thinks that his/her ideas are better than yours, or whatever the person's problem is. That doesn't ...


10

I don't think it's "normal", although there are probably designers who do it. When deadlines have been tight, I've collaborated with clients over the phone while sharing static images with them at the same time using the Adobe Cloud, however I think screen sharing is akin to having the client stand behind you, and it's too invasive. Personally, I wouldn't ...


6

Not normal practice and you probably already know this from the way the question is asked. This is apparently about a logo so it cannot be text revisions, in which case he's probably looking to give you some ideas on revising the shape, the color, the symbol or whatever it is you are working on this logo. So it can't be a large volume of requests, instead ...


4

I would use that session only to take notes. The question is, is that normal? On a cheap workshop where the "designer" is the client, and the operator is just the interface to the computer, yes. On a studio, no. It is not professional. It is cheap, it makes think the client is the one filled with good ideas, with taste, with knowledge, with proportion... ...


36

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


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