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Any piece I use in my portfolio is used as it was delivered to the client. While I've been fortunate the last few years and have had considerable control over client revisions and changes, it's common practice for many clients to alter work later. Especially web work. When showing my portfolio, I simply explain all pieces are as delivered to clients and ...


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Many times clients will take work and turn it upside down internally. This may happen the next day, or after 6 months and when it does, its generally their decision and nothing to do with what you delivered 6 months ago. Presumably, having paid for the work, they own the work, so they can do anything to it, with or without asking for your opinion. I'd just ...


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Ask your client how they'd like to proceed: You can hand art (PDF, usually) either directly to client or directly to printer. Or you can suggest that you coordinate the printing on your client's behalf, either for a fixed fee or an agreed hourly rate. A written agreement should better define the services offered, such as securing competitive quotations, ...


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Your portfolio showcases your best work, even if it's not ultimately used by your client. Some portfolio reviewers insist that work shown be client work, not simply speculative or personal exploration. I favor showing your best regardless of source, as this is what demonstrates your capabilities. If a person asks 'is this the design used by your client?' ...


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Required?.... no. Can you?.... if you want to. You can either subcontract printing services and then mark up the costs and pass them on to your clients. This makes you responsible for paying all printing costs regardless of whether your client pays you or not. You can offset the risk by requiring deposits on printing services. This means you can profit a ...


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There's no general rule saying you should or should not include a printing service. However, i'd say most independent designers will not deliver prints for clients. They can sometimes recommend a specific print provider, but rarely get involved in the actual printing process. That's mainly because a designer's job is usually to deliver that print-ready PDF,...


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