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16

The reason is when you're buying the font for a desktop, it can be used to author text on one or two machines, by one person. When you have a game the game authors those texts on many machines so the situation is the same as if you'd buy a license for each player separately. So as long as the font has a pay per usage model a game would constitute many uses. ...


11

You could create a custom Pattern brush, and apply it to a path. Create a rectangle filled grey, no stroke, and and draw a single white stroke on one edge Group those, drag and drop it in the brushes palette, choose "Pattern Brush" as the brush type Then apply the Pattern brush to a path. Draw some circles


11

Short answer: This specific example is (low-resolution) EGA pixel art (with the default CGA palette), and that's what I would call the style if I saw it. NES pixel art is identified either as '8-bit pixel art' (see below) or simply as 'NES pixel art'. You can use a search engine to see more examples of each style, and find tutorials to match them. Less short ...


10

**These steps will work the same in either Illustrator or Photoshop** Illustrator may be easier for what you need but if you want to use Photoshop you can still follow these steps: Why don't you actually make a paper plane and take a photo of it from what ever angle you need e.g. from the top or from the side and then import the image into Photoshop. Then ...


9

When evaluating graphics software for pixel art this is the kind of tools I'm looking for: The most well known software that is also great for pixel art is Photoshop. If you don't have access to it and are looking for the next best alternative, look at GIMP. I've been happily using it on Macs since around 2010 and it has everything you need for pixel art. ...


8

PikoPixel is a free pixel-art editor.          Easy to use Unlimited undo Supports multiple layers Customizable canvas background Hotkey-activated popup panels Export upscaled images Runs on OS X 10.4 Tiger & later


8

You can pick the Pen tool (p) to draw your path, then use the stroke menu (click stroke left of the stroke width box) to make a dashed line, as seen in the following picture : About path spliting, you can simply draw a new path with your points anchored to the first one. Here's what I come up with very quickly :


5

What you are looking for is MagicaVoxel It's an 8-bit voxel modeling and animating program that's free and open-source. The software is still in its infancy but there are a small amount of tutorials showing how to create scenes and animate them. Other options: There's also a large list of other free programs here. Notable other options are Aseprite ...


4

SVG would be an excellent cross-platform, cross-medium vector-based art file format. But I wouldn't recommend using Illustrator's default SVG exports as they tend to come cluttered with unneccessary metadata and often are quite un-optimized. Instead, save your source artwork as native AI file formats (in case you need to go back and re-edit), and then export ...


4

Set your canvas size so it correlates to the pixel size you want to use. That way you can use 1:1 pixel tools in photoshop. When it comes time to use the actual images, you can then re-scale in Photoshop or possibly in the app framework itself. For example, if the physical device is 1920x1080 and you want your virtual "8-bit" pixels to be 8x8 device pixel, ...


4

I think your example for why you used the darker colour in the foreground is showing much more distance than your game needs to. That's why it works so well for the mountains but not so much for the buildings. I would also mention that your background is darker at the top and lighter at the bottom. This depth would be complimented if your higher buildings ...


4

For a 2d side scrolling game. Vector style. Using Stencyl That is the key bit of info we needed! Looking at their documentation for animations it looks like animation is handled within the app--meaning that you create the individual animations yourself outside, then import them as individual frames. As such, it appears that the tool you need is a drawing ...


4

It sounds like what you are looking for is a data merge solution. Data merge is simply where you have a shell document with variables in it and a data file (usually a spreadsheet saved as a CSV file) that is used to replace the variables. There are a lot of solutions for this. Here are a few (some of these will require that you re-create or import your ...


4

If you want a good product, work with a designer. You could spend hundreds of hours learning how to work with a program and how to optimize the workflow. Just imagine a designer asking how to start doing the backend of the game. Sure It can be done, but I am pretty sure you would think the same recommendation. Look for someone that already knows what needs ...


3

Just use one of the filters in filters/edge-detect - with some extra actions until you get what you want. What I did here: duplicated the layer, cut out the oceans (I don't know if it is your intention) by clicking on one by one with the magic-wand, right click on the layer in the layers dialog, add alpha channel, then edit->cut. After that, , select->...


3

Since you mention a cost-effective solution for art style, I'd look into vector bundles or creation kits such as this one. Some of them are even specifically aimed for games, like this one. Lots of them are characters, and they can be used for any app or even for digital books. Of course you would only be able to use these if you want to create the apps ...


3

Hello again (I'm the guy from StackOverflow). I don't really understand the problem, but looking at your image I do notice something odd. First of all, your sprite sheet has 6 frames and is 720 pixels wide. Normally, this would mean that each frame should be 720 / 6 = 120 pixels wide. This is how each frame should be limited: All rectangles there are ...


3

After more searching, I found a program that can accomplish this effect very easily. As stated in one of the comments, a search in Google that leads to similar images is: 8-bit isometric voxels http://hexraystudios.com/hexels/


3

As in the comments its not really an exact style. 8bit ish, Voxel ish, basically its hipster :) To go about making these, espescially for a game of any scale. I would use a pipeline of Illustrator (or Inkscape) and then import into Blender or another 3D program. While you could get away with making these in a 2D program. It'll be hard to maintain ...


3

While dedicated sprite editors are handy, I'd recommend using Illustrator (or other vector editing software) to draw pixel art. That allows you to retain the look of pixels but gain the benefit of a resolution-independent source. Adobe has a starter page with tips on drawing pixel art in Photoshop or Illustrator (also applicable to free alternatives like ...


2

So in GIMP 2.8 you can do this: Make a rectangular selection the size you want your button to be Be sure to select rounded corners in the tool options Save this selection to a channel, just to be sure you can retrieve it whenever you want Create a new layer for the button background, fill it with you base color Invert your selection in selection->invert Go ...


2

I love using PyxelEdit, it gives me everything I need without the size and weight of PhotoShop. Among the great features are: animation, spritesheet export, tileset importing, layers... check it out here. The Price is small and it runs on any system that supports Adobe Air. There is an older (free) version for testing. Cheers rikki.o


2

I am skeptical about the idea that "vectors aren't supported." I am certain that libraries exist for all mobile platforms: vectors are only ever viewed as raster images. {edit for clarity:} While the "mipmap" discussion below refers to 3d rendering, the mipmaps themselves are "raster" textures to be applied during rendering. There is no reason one cannot ...


2

I don't see one particular aesthetic to either of those. In terms of what 'type' of artwork that is, a number of descriptors could apply: concept art (typically for movies/games) matte paintings/background artwork landscapes


2

You can achieve a similar look in Illustrator. After creating objects (with pen tool or shapes), go to Effects > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Just make sure there is no blur and play with the settings. There are tutorials about 8bit design online. If you want to copy your example, you would just need to rotate the objects (15 degrees).


2

It depends on what programming environment you're comfortable in and the format you're able to supply your primitives. As I mentioned here, I've had pretty good luck with Flat and Even from http://xxyxyz.org/. The project hasn't been updated in some time, though, so your milage may vary. Processing is also a nice choice and has a very active community ...


2

If you're asking what kinds of techniques were used for that specific image, it could include: outer glows (the white glow around some elements) inner glows (the glow inside the controller) drop shadows (the shadows beneath the text) gradients (the arrows going from light to transparent) opacity (the entire thing has an opacity less than 100% an ...


2

I'm sure you can create this from scratch in Photoshop using various brushes but an easier way to do this is to draw it by hand on paper and then scan it in and open it up in photoshop to refine. Many designers use this technique as a starting point or just to get that organic feel for a piece.


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