18

"Margin" is the term for the area inset from the trim to the content. Another term possibly more related to bleed is "Safe area" (or similar). This is often smaller than any margins and is (similar to bleed) usually a small distance specified by the printer as an area to avoid placing content in as it will possibly be trimmed (since trimming is never as ...


14

If what you mean is an area that is left (mostly) empty to prevent content from being flush to the edge of the medium, then margin is the world you are looking for.


14

It's called kerning, which is an additional spacing applied to specific pairs of characters1. The aim is to have a perceived equal spacing between glyphs. Mathematically equal spacing based on the bounding box of each glyph doesn't always work since glyphs have very different shapes; some having a lot of empty space within the bounding box, and some hardly ...


13

I, personally, won't never rely on the lower left corner of an advertisement to convey anything. It's a dead zone, easily forgotten or overlooked by the viewer. I, perhaps mistakenly, get the feeling that there may be more imagery than what your samples show. If not, then it may be merely due to the usage in your samples. Trying to force the lower left ...


11

There is no formula for calculating what the clear space should be. It's entirely a matter of preference for whoever is designing the logo and/or style guide for the use of said logo. For instance, if you take the GDSE logo, the clear space could be defined as the height of the text (which would be quite tight) or the height of the circle (which would be ...


10

What do you have there that Image->Autocrop image did not work?


10

This is merely my opinion... take it all with a grain of salt. Realize that I know nothing about your company, it's audience, the target market, the nature of the trade show. What you sell, what you profit from, who your owners are.. etc.... all of this helps target a design. I have merely focused on visual elements in your given image. This is a visual ...


7

Select All (Cmd/Ctrl A) Object > Artboards > Fit to Artwork Bounds File > Save As Format: SVG This sets the origin to: x="0px" y="0px" The viewBox to: "0 0 [Your image's width] [Your image's height] " And "enable-background:new 0 0 [Your image's width] [Your image's height];"


7

In the scope of web design, which seems to be the scope of the OP's question, I would rather use web-related terms as opposed to trying to import typesetting terms from the (fascinating) printed media world. I would call this "vertical margin" as in the CSS margin property. The margin is the spacing between the border of adjacent elements (as opposed to the ...


6

Claustrophobic text: I think your current issue is that this text is too similar to the text below. It's a tad bigger but otherwise same color, same weight. I would try to increase the differences so the eye doesn't get confused with those two levels. "Empty" space I would try to add some depth and create unity by reusing small elements in the ...


5

The answer to most any "when should I use typestyle X" is: when it looks appropriate. That said, note that condensed faces are typically considered display faces. They're not necessarily meant for use as a text face, but rather for things like headers and headlines. Newspapers especially like them because you can fit a lot more into a headline with a ...


5

Looking at any design, be it a website, flyer, brochure, poster, anything on paper or on screen, whitespace is literally what the name says: all the unoccupied space surrounding everything else on the design. Whitespace does not need to be white, it can be black or pretty much any color, the term refers more to that space in a design which is empty of any ...


5

It's not really about legibility. The text can be understood whether it's justified or not. The issue, as I see it, is about readability - how easy it is to read the text, how much effort must the viewer expend in order to ingest the copy. The overall problem with full justification is accessibility. People with cognitive disabilities, or older audiences, ...


4

EDIT: While everything I said in my answer is true, the answer that you are looking for is Qutorial's answer below. It's tested and it works nicely. Keep in mind that while using his method you need to be in text-editing mode with the focus in front of the first letter, only then you can change the value from auto (or 0) to a negative one! I'm sorry to ...


4

In typesetting terms, Slug is a common term for a horizontal gap. - Space after/before a paragraph, a horizontal gap between sections, or between rules, etc. The slug has a specified size similar to type sizes and would be placed inline with the metal type to create the proper vertical spacing. based upon the edit.... Cell padding seems the most obvious ...


4

I much prefer design 1 It's got great use of white space and gives priority to the information. It also shows the shape of the map in a much more subtle way, 'there but not there'. In the second design the type seems a little squashed into a shape that takes priority, that is by comparison to design 1 which is very fluid (literally) it seems to have a '...


4

When exporting as PNG make sure you check the box which says "Use Artboards"


4

You need to study this part of the ID interface, especially the "Cell Height" (which forces your rows to be taller) and "Top/Bottom Cell Insets" (same result, but by increasing inside cell margins) on the right side. There's also a lot of Youtube content on this.


4

I use InDesign so cannot speak for Scribus but the shortcut for a 1/8em space in InDesign (non-breaking by default) is cmd+option+shift+m or ctrl+alt+shift+m. Some people simply do a find/change and change it all by hand. This is usually how I teach my students to do it because we only work on short documents. I used to layout a magazine and got tired of ...


4

I have this client and we typeset multiple brochures each month in 15+ languges (French included) and each language is translated from English by a professional translator. For the French layer, i've never been asked to use 1/8 spaces. They do indeed insert normal spaces before ? ! ; » and after «. The client is a multinational so if this was critical for ...


4

In my experience, most french speaking people simply insert a space. It's a pain, but this is what most are used to. The result is that they are not very picky on the width of the space, but some space must be! Most designers speak of a thin space (espace fine), so this is probably the most common choice in typography. In the Web you can find some ...


4

If you create a shape around your voucher with no fill and no stroke, and group it with your voucher artwork, then you could enable snapping to place copies in the right position. There's no need to use grids/guides at all. Example:


4

The other two answers are very good. I'd like to add that the "IMP" looks slightly shifted to the left compares to the "ART". This is mainly due to the whiteapace in the P of IMP and the A of ART. You could try to move the IMP slightly to the right (will result in the logo being geomentrically imperfect) or adjusting the letters A and P. This font has no ...


4

Newspapers and magazines both require advertising space to be booked ahead of time to allow them to plan the layout of the adds. Sometimes only a day or two in the case of a daily newspaper, but more typically weeks or months in advance, especially for magazines. They also allocate a set amount of space / number of pages for editorial content and for ...


4

If Exporting, tick the Use Artboards box in the Export dialog window and select the artboard number you want to export (or all). If using Save For Web, tick Clip to Artboard in the Save for Web dialog window if you wish Save for Web to use the artboard as the final size of the image. I realize the term "clip" may be counter intuitive. But with it UNticked, ...


3

Here is one reasoning I have read for the use of open em dashes (with spaces) instead of closed ones (without spaces). Some fonts have a very narrow em dash. The em dash was supposed to be used closed because it is was large enough to create a visual break. Very narrow em dashes fail in this case. If you are merely providing text without marrying it to a ...


3

Short answer I would use "row spacing". Long answer As JDB mentioned, I too would rather use web-related terms as opposed to trying to import typesetting terms from the (fascinating) printed media world. I would use the terms "column spacing" and "row spacing" because most grid layouts use the terms "column" and "...


3

Two ideas: Change to View > Outline Mode. Do you see anything as outlined? What happens if you Select All; open Artboard Options; change the Preset to Fit to Selected Art? Then try Export > Save for Web (not the usual Save or Save As).


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