46

It's interesting, but (I assume) It's really the three dots that is the tie into 'TRItium'. As such, I'd consider dumping both the circle and the hexagon. They seem superfluous to the concept. They are nice, but (and this is just my opinion) in the world of software, those tend to give off a bit of a video game vibe--which may or may not be your objective. ...


26

I suggest ditching the hexagon, as it adds no value. If anything, it's confusing. In chemistry, the first thought that comes to mind when I see a hexagon is "benzene ring". That's not what you wanted to draw, right? The alternate version of the hexagon, with oddly aligned edges, is completely disconcerting to me.


20

Okay others have good points, I would like to add a new one. The logo is size challenged in that the details are a bit too small. This may be a problem if you need to: work in small scales such as 24 x 24 pixel icons (or even smaller) Print a business card sized medium, you would now need the ring to be quite big for the dots to be visible. I think the ...


20

I want to portray myself as a fresh, young but old-school designer that has an appreciation for crisp, clean design, though isn't afraid to go wild. Just my opinion.... take it with a grain of salt. Nothing about picking a font and adjusting the letter spacing reads "isn't afraid to go wild" or even "crisp and clean". To me (someone with a designer's eye) ...


19

I'm thinking keep it simple, and concentrate on the typography. Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with 3 nucleons. So maybe use two of the nucleons for the 'i's' and one 'floater': As Tritium is radioactive it decays, and so does the typography. Loose quick sketch but you get the idea. Logo should work at most sizes, with spacing adjustment for ...


19

Mi opinion: Use the atom as a secondary asset only. Your last sample, the website with the type alone, is great. The colors are interesting, the word and its shape as well. The straight lines work, especially if you try for example with the atom in the background -see image below-. I see it and sort of get more both the speech ('soft') and engine ('...


13

I've designed minimalist icon sets and there are three factors which, together, make for a pretty clear indication of where the line should be. In order of importance: Usability (which, ultimately, is what icons should be for) - the most important line is the point beyond which where more minimalism makes it slower and less automatic to see what the icon is ...


12

Not sure that the Hexagon in the BG is of much help and it might be just ruining the effort that u have put in. How about removing the BG Hexagon and just the three circles that can now be increased in size and used in the center of the circle. That would look way better. I am just attaching an image that is more close to what I am saying and that way it ...


12

What you'd like to do falls under "don't". From page 68 of the Facebook Product Assets and Identity Guide: DON'T Modify the “f” logo in any way, such as changing design or color. If you are unable to use the correct color due to technical limitations, you may revert to black and white. Cutting the 'f' away from the backdrop is definitely ...


11

Removing is modifying Of course you'd be modifying the logo: you're taking away a fundamental piece of the design. Facebook would be overjoyed if the internet promoted their brand exactly as they've spec'd it. They paid a lot of money for that style guide! But social media is an unruly space With the internet as your defense attorney, you can establish ...


9

I think the only real con is your limited color space. And that isn't necessarily a huge con... Some great designers have embraced the photocopier. One that comes to mind is Art Chantry who, IMHO, is just as responsible for the Seattle Grunge scene as Nirvana was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Chantry Granted, that's a particular aesthetic that may ...


9

Obviously the sharper the transition the better - but sometimes compromises are needed. I was working at an organisation that had this exact issue. They were large, very budget-conscious organisation with lots of very varied branded products with very varied stock turnaround, and a new brand that was maybe 40% similar to the old brand. They did it in a ...


8

Look and feel is a brand thing Your visual decisions should not only be based on information architecture but an essence, a personality that's unique the brand in question. Your first steps should have nothing to do with execution. No type, colors, images, graphics. That will come later as a logical extension of the brand. Start with Demographics ...


8

I have a different take on the subject. The logo should communicate something about the product, not the product's name (I am giggling at the thought of a Microsoft logo of an itty bitty pillow). The product is a speech synthesis program. I get that tritium is a chemistry based word and I like the sound of it, but speech synthesis has nothing to do with ...


8

Most branding use Pantone colors along CMYK and RGB colors. PMS (Pantone Matching System) allows for more precision in the reproduction of colors by using 10 different inks (as opposed to 4 for CMYK). These colors are usually documented in a branding style guide. In the case of Expedia, you can find the blue on page 20 and its recommended values in various ...


7

I think that in an ideal world you would dispose/recycle the old materials and rollout new ones at once but this isn't an ideal world. I would also say that there's actually three types of companies in this class: Mega corporations Large companies Small businesses I would imagine only the large companies would be able to afford to dispose of their ...


7

That said is it bad to assume in re-branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Yes. I have found it a mistake to assume the preferred method of communication from any client. I have clients that I've never personally spoken to and everything is handled via email. I have clients who will send an email then call to see if I got ...


7

I agree with 200_success about ditching the hexagon because it adds no value...and am also unsure how Tritium relates to a speech-synthesis engine as Scott points out. However, I like the atom graphic (which I think is clean & simple but interesting, particularly with the bit of incongruity that the electron adds); and I will assume for the moment that ...


7

The word «TRITIUM» is so cool. No need for an aditional Graphicmark. Focus on superprecise typography instead (like in the website mockup).


7

Ideally all collateral material is designed, formatted, and created by those that know design and would therefore have the brand fonts installed. Just because a piece is not "exciting" or visually important, such as a contract, it doesn't mean a designer should avoid it. A well designed, branded contract carries a solid message with it. Forms which ...


7

Is it normal practice to use two different fonts for print material and email? Yes. Actually, it's normal practice do not specify any font in email. Email is text and not everyone wants HTML formatted email. And most people don't want to have to download a font just to view their email--especially on a mobile network.


7

The goal of a rebrand would (pretty much) always be to increase market share / turnover / profit. I've only encountered the opposite aim once, when a supermarket had a loss-leader product that was selling too well and costing them too much money so they rebranded to reduce sales, but I digress... The two key questions when considering a rebrand are what ...


7

I'm uncertain what "matches" means. The symbol is really nice. The type.. well it's just a font with some letter spacing in 2 faces. Not that in itself that's bad, but it doesn't seem to be as cohesive as the symbol. In the stacked version, the type is, in my opinion, way too small in comparison to the symbol. In the horizontal version, the leading ...


6

Shouldn't all brands have some kind of idea or concept behind their brand identity? Sure. The fallacy here is thinking that there is no concept or idea... There should of course always be an idea, a concept and clear rationalisations for every design decision you make. But that doesn't always have to come across obviously in a finished design. I'm sure a ...


5

It really depends on many factors, such as the industry the company is in, the reason behind the brand refresh and various others. Putting myself in the rather comfortable shoes of a CEO, I would immediately discount Option A for any company with a marketing budget less than at least $20 million, and even then writing it off would cost 5% of the budget. ...


5

In my opinion, anything which the clients sees in relation to the photography and its business should be branded. Stationery (card, letterhead, envelope) Web Site Photographic prints Invoices Quotes Receipts Model Releases Call sheets Buildings (signage if there is a building) Equipment (could just be stickers) The more places you can get your brand in the ...


5

Whether or not a website is effective is primarily dependent on the intended purposes of the website and the usability of it. As such, one of the two choices should not apply to every company. If the purpose of the website is to be a static page much like a print work/flyer but happens to be on the web, for example when it's meant only to provide the ...


5

The massive 150-page Design Guidelines I worked on used a variant of option 2. There was a section in the Guidelines about PowerPoint, which stated that branded, designed templates existed (with company logo, colors, and layout) and were to be used, but within those templates, standard system fonts (Arial and Times, probably) were used in place of the ...


5

Rather than critiquing your logo specifically, I think it would be more beneficial to give you some more general advice that can apply to any design. I think this video (Aaron Draplin's logo design workflow) might be enough to get the point across, but the key things you'll want to think about here are: Size. Should some elements of your logo be larger, ...


5

At its heart, this is simply called "line art," and as DA01 states, halftone dots are really just a method to get a continuous tone (photograph etc) into line-art form for printing with a single ink. Map makers are usually free to choose the tones they use, but in some case, such as geological survey, the texture choices are formalized so as to represent ...


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