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2

I repeat my old comment: As long as your images do not have common simple shapes such as straight lines or circles very loose warping should be plausible enough. But the light and shadows should be right. Could you accept it? If yes you can do it in 2D. An example One of your unused socks is clipped and pasted over an image of a foot as a new layer. A mesh ...


5

To my knowledge there's no way to use UV data in Photoshop and I'm not sure it would help with this example because the deformation is quite strong: it'd be a job for vector displacement filter (which Photoshop also doesn't have). If I had a task like this I'd go 3d and since you have Blender as a tag, here's a little breakdown of how I'd approach this: ...


0

In Photoshop you can use Edit → Transform → Warp, and choose Arc in the tool options along the top. Then you change the shape by clicking and dragging the top handle. Example


0

Draw the wanted frame in Illustrator. You can for ex. align 2 circles and lines. Then fill the wanted piece with the Shape builder. Delete the extra parts and use the frame as the top object in Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Top Object. It's tried here: The lines were originally vertical, they are rotated plus and minus 30 degrees to get 60 degrees ...


1

There's an error in the original code, it's not supposed to work. Maybe the author forgot to post the correct answer? The good news that it's easy to fix: the line #25 should be like this: doc.activeLayer = set.layers[i]; Otherwise it was trying to assign a whole set to an active layer which doesn't make sense. However, the bad news is that this ...


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